How do YOU choose new products?

Most responses will likely include (in no particular order):

  • function,

  • interoperability,

  • realism,

  • durability & maintenance,

  • and of course, budget.

Recommendations from peers and demonstrations at conferences may also influence the decision maker.

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The choices seem limitless with VR and AR and AI and Mixed Reality and Fidelity to fit every need!

Can it still be argued that real practice on real people is the best way to develop real competence and real confidence?

Perhaps it’s best when the two are blended….

"Simulation specialists who add the human component to the simulated experience were found to make the simulated environment more realistic and consequently more conducive to learning caring behaviors." Ward et al., Int J Nurs Clin Pract 2017, 4: 257 https://doi.org/10.15344/2394-4978/2017/257

How can we provide simulated learning on real people without risking injury? This was a problem we decided to solve when we created ReaLifeSim wearable vascular access training simulators.

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Worn by real people to encourage provider-patient communication and add the human dimension, they can also be used as an “add-on” to high-cost high-fidelity manikins for enhanced function and extended sustainability so as not to have to damage costly equipment for routine skills.

But, it can and will be even better:

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“If people would realize how important it is to exploit those aspects of reality that cannot yet be replicated in VR, then we'd be much further ahead in healthcare sim than we are.  Now, take the techniques shown here and add the VR for simulating different training contexts, as we're doing with our Mixed Reality Medical Emergency Response Team trainer and you have a real recipe for success.” Bob Stone, Director, Human Interface Technologies Team at University of Birmingham (UK), credit for above image.

Real practice on real people may always play an important role in developing and maintaining hands-on and interpersonal skills, but advances in clinical simulation are challenging that premise every day.