#EMTs

Emphasizing standardized patients and additional realism with ReaLifeSim

Andrew Spain wrote "Standardized patients are defined as “a person who has been carefully coached to simulate an actual patient so accurately that the simulation cannot be detected by a skilled clinician."

Why wouldn't we want to emphasize realism during our scenarios?

How can this be achieved with a real person next to a manikin arm to start an IV?

What if there was a device that was not over engineered - portable - lightweight - adaptable to almost every scenario?

Wearable ReaLifeSim IV trainers & blood draw trainers attach to the SP's arm and provide high-quality, smart, and efficient experiences for learners to "train the way you treat."

Enhancing the training scenario by adding ReaLifeSim IV trainers to a standardized patient will give students the confidence and competence that is needed to properly treat future patients.

 

"Real Practice with Real People Equals Real Confidence"

In a SIMTALKBLOG from PocketNurse, Jim Benson shows the importance of adding the human factor to training scenarios. 

Nurses like Elizabeth Benson and Linda Goodman saw the need for a device that brought back communication in their simulations. They knew that having such a device will provide the students the confidence to successfully carry out the scenario. 

Thus ReaLifeSim was born. Wearable training technology that provides "the opportunity for self- and peer- assessment, and traditional instructor guidance and evaluation."

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Poor Communication Kills - Are You Doing Enough To Prevent It?

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A CRICO Strategies study published last year indicated communication failures were linked to just under 2000 patient deaths in a five year span and $1.7 billion in malpractice costs. And, a study from the University of California, San Francisco, found more than a quarter of hospital re-admissions could be avoided with better communication among healthcare teams and between providers and patients. 

In training, as well as in practice, effective interpersonal and team communication should be equal partners with the latest technologies to provide the best treatment and care. 

Realistic team interaction practice helps prevent panic, promote appropriate behaviors and coordinated responses among stakeholders, and prioritize mobilizing resources. A look, a tone of voice, a facial expression, a touch - all can communicate competence and caring. Interpersonal communication is critical to establishing the trust necessary between the provider and recipient of care in the healthcare environment.

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Clinical simulation scenarios with standardized participants provide some of the most realistic opportunities possible.  

Participants (student and providers) can work together in an environment that is as close to the real thing as possible. They can identify and correct their own actions as they experience the challenges that occur as multiple people and perhaps multiple departments and agencies try to coordinate care in training scenarios/events.

This is why we do what we do.

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At ReaLifeSim, we focus on human factor realism to promote clear communication, competency, and compassion. Our contribution to increased provider competence and confidence leading to increased patient safety goes back at the beginning - in the education and training. 

We're committed to ensure the human aspect of healthcare delivery endures in an increasingly virtual world.

Increasing the use of standardized participants in clinical simulations can provide high-fidelity clinical simulations and human interaction.

But, the clinical realism of standardized participants is often lacking. There are impressive advances in moulage, and with wearable products like ReaLifeSim and a few others. Would your learners benefit from more "Real Life" realism in the simulation experiences you offer?

EMS - Always There. Any Time. Any Where.

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I trained in EMS a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away. Okay, not really, but it was the 1970's in New Jersey, so it sometimes feels like that.

We were on the leading edge of the evolution from those we affectionately called 'lead-footed ambulance drivers' to EMS professionals. We were trained first-aiders armed with O2, bandages, and a defibrillator. Now, EMS professionals assess, triage, and provide essential life-saving medical care in homes, at roadsides, and in austere environments. 

Throughout the years, our ambulance drivers, first-aiders, EMTs and paramedics volunteered long hours and sleepless nights taking care of the needs of our communities. They've missed holidays and special events with their loved ones, committed to help working with their family of emergency care and first responders.

This week we join NAEMT and countless other organizations to ensure the important contributions of EMS practitioners in safeguarding the health, safety and well-being of their communities are fully celebrated and recognized.

Thank you for your time and dedication. Thank you for your compassion and commitment. Thank you for risking your safety, for your bravery. Thank you for being at the ready to help 24/7, 365 days a year.